Well Visits

PREPARING FOR A WELL VISIT

In order to maximize what you get out of a well check (and minimize tears!), we want you to feel prepared for each of your child’s well visits. At each visit, we will discuss your child’s feeding and nutrition, sleeping, elimination, and developmental milestones as well as any concerns you might have. We find that children who are prepped for possible vaccines and procedures are less afraid of them at the time of their visits.

Prenatal Visit+
Newborn Visits-

Congratulations on the birth of your baby! During these visits we spend a great deal of time with you establishing a foundation that will help you smoothly transition into parenthood. We want to ensure that you and your child feel supported. We review any concerns or complications from delivery and we discuss feeding, elimination, weight changes, bathing, cord care, spitting up, jaundice and more! It is important for all new parents to know that it is not only normal, but expected, for newborns to lose weight that first week of life.

What are some helpful resources for new parents:

  • See our “For Parents” tab for numerous websites, books and dosage recommendations
  • For all prenatal and postpartum parental and infant support: The Flourish Fund
  • Lactation support:

Healthy Babies, Happy Moms

Women & Infants' Warm Line

Alison Miranda Lactation Support IBCLC

First Droplets- breastfeeding videos and support 

The Lactation Network

Book: Breastfeeding Made Simple

1 Month Visit+

This is an important visit to discuss growth, developmental milestones, and feeding. Your baby is starting to gain some head control and is working his or her neck and upper body muscles during tummy time. We also discuss how caretakers are adjusting to parenthood and how to optimize support for new parents. This is a great time to start reading and talking to your infant throughout the day.

How do I prevent my infant from getting a flat area on his or her head?
Check out this video about Plagiocephaly!

Vaccines: None
Screenings: Parental Depression Screen

2 Month Visit+

You and your baby are probably starting to get into a groove now! This is our first vaccine visit and we discuss why vaccines are important and what to expect after we give them. For questions about vaccines, please do not hesitate to ask. Also, we encourage you to look at information from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Vaccine Education Center - this is a wonderfully comprehensive website about vaccines.

Are there side effects to vaccines today?
Most infants experience no side effects to vaccines but a small percentage may experience fussiness, low grade fever (rectal temperature >100.4 F), sore legs, or red bumps at the injection sites . If needed, you may give your child a dose of acetaminophen (Tylenol) for discomfort. Please see our medication dosing chart for the correct dose. No ibuprofen for infants

Vaccines: DTaP-Hep B-IPV, PCV, HiB, Rotavirus
Screenings: Parental Depression Screen, Pediatric Developmental Screen

4 Month Visit+

This visit is an important one, particularly with regards to sleep. Check out Dr. Raufi’s videos on setting up a successful environment and tips on how to extend those sleep cycles at night! Some infants are also interested in starting solids around this time! Dr. Raufi has a video on Introducing Solids - when, why and how!

What about teething?
Check out Dr. Raufi’s video on teething to know the signs and symptoms of teething and what to do when those pearly whites start popping up!

Vaccines: DTaP-Hep B-IPV, PCV, HiB, Rotavirus
Screenings: Pediatric Developmental Screen

6 Month Visit+

Please know that children develop at their own pace. While we expect certain milestones by different ages, do not be alarmed if your child takes a slightly different course. If you have concerns at any time, please do not hesitate to bring those to our attention.

Now your baby is becoming more independent! At this age babies are learning how to sit with support, using their hands to feed themselves, and making lots of noise! This is an important visit to discuss your child’s nutrition. Infants should be repetitively exposed to food allergens around 5-6 months of age to minimize their risk of food allergies - check out Dr. Raufi’s videos on Introducing Solids and Introducing Food Allergens to your baby confidently! Questions about heavy metals? We have a video on that too!

Six months is also the age when infants should start drinking water to get fluoride - we recommend 2-4oz filtered tap/fluoridated water per day… in an open cup or straw cup! Your little one should hopefully start to sleep through the night and is likely going from 3 naps to 2 naps a day. FYI see if you can wean your child off his or her pacifier if you want - sometimes getting rid of it earlier is easier than later!

It is also safe to start using sunscreen and bug spray. We recommend mineral sunscreen brands such as: Goddess Garden, Blue Lizard, Babo, Badger, and ThinkBaby.

Vaccines: DTaP-Hep B-IPV, PCV, 1st Flu vaccine (during flu season)
Screenings: Parental Depression Screen, Pediatric Developmental Screen

9 Month Visit+

Please know that children develop at their own pace. While we expect certain milestones by different ages, do not be alarmed if your child takes a slightly different course. If you have concerns at any time, please do not hesitate to bring those to our attention.

Be sure to baby proof your home because soon your child will be quite mobile! This includes baby gates, locks on cabinets, and ensuring furniture/bureaus are attached to the walls. We recommend avoiding baby walkers. Your baby is also working on his/her pincer grasp so get those finger foods ready! Consider weaning off the pacifier around this time… it is easier when infants are younger!

Vaccines: Seasonal flu
Screenings: Pediatric Developmental Screen
Other Procedures: Vision screening, fluoride varnish

12 Month Visit+

Please know that children develop at their own pace. While we expect certain milestones by different ages, do not be alarmed if your child takes a slightly different course. If you have concerns at any time, please do not hesitate to bring those to our attention.

Congrats on making it 1 whole year! This is truly a milestone for caretakers so take time to celebrate! Your child is now probably starting to eat just what you eat. If your child is formula fed, start to transition him or her to whole milk, about 18-24 oz per day. If you do not want to offer cow’s milk, talk to us about pros and cons of milk alternatives. If you are breastfeeding, feel free to continue to do so as long as you want. Start to wean off bottles and transition fully to open cups and straw cups over the next few months. Keep up the safety proofing - your curious little one will constantly be exploring! Continue to read often to your child and soon you’ll hear her say a few words of her own!

When/How should I transition my child off of formula or breastmilk?
There is no correct way to do this. Some infants transition more slowly (half formula/breastmilk, half whole milk) and others take whole milk right away! 

Why do you check iron and lead levels often?
In accordance with AAP guidelines, we check iron and lead often because both have a very important role in cognition and development. If you have concerns about your child’s iron needs or concerns about possible lead exposures, please let us know!

Vaccines: MMR, Varicella, Hepatitis A, seasonal Flu
Screenings: Pediatric Developmental Screen
Other Procedures: Vision screening, Iron screening, Lead screening, Fluoride varnish
Safety: Water safety

15 Month Visit+

Please know that children develop at their own pace. While we expect certain milestones by different ages, do not be alarmed if your child takes a slightly different course. If you have concerns at any time, please do not hesitate to bring those to our attention.

Watch out - now your little one is really on the go! You might notice over the next few months that your voracious eater may start to skip a meal here or there. This can be normal - just don’t let them fill up on snack foods. 15 month olds should be working on their fine motor skills such as scribbling with a crayon and feeding themselves. Keep on reading to your child to maximize his or her language skills! Continue working on brushing with a small amount of fluoride toothpaste twice a day - those 4 back molars are coming in (if they haven’t already!).

Vaccines: HiB, PCV13, and seasonal Flu.
Screenings: Pediatric Developmental Screen
Other Procedures: Vision screening, Fluoride varnish

18 Month Visit+

Please know that children develop at their own pace. While we expect certain milestones by different ages, do not be alarmed if your child takes a slightly different course. If you have concerns at any time, please do not hesitate to bring those to our attention.

Now your child is practicing walking up stairs - he or she might be a little clumsy but they sure are moving fast! An 18-month old should also be using objects and toys for pretend play. At this time your child will likely have 10-20 words that they use purposefully. He/she should be working on pointing to body parts and completing one step tasks. You might notice a little defiance which is completely normal and developmentally appropriate - your child is trying to assert his/her independence (but also keep your attention!). Continue to offer a variety of foods and don’t be put off by sudden pickiness - just keep serving them what you want them to eat. It’s their decision whether or not to eat it.

When should I transition my child out of the crib?
Wait as long as safely possible! Children who cannot get themselves out of their crib should remain in a crib. Most children sleep better in cribs than in toddler beds!

Vaccines: DTaP, Hepatitis A, and seasonal Flu.
Screenings: Pediatric Developmental Screen, MCHAT
Other Procedures: Vision screening, Iron, Fluoride varnish

24 Month Visit+

Please know that children develop at their own pace. While we expect certain milestones by different ages, do not be alarmed if your child takes a slightly different course. If you have concerns at any time, please do not hesitate to bring those to our attention.

Hooray for your 2 year old! Your child is working on his/her language skills with 50+ words! 2 year olds are running, jumping, throwing and kicking a ball and climbing equipment at the playground.

When should I turn my child’s car seat forward facing?
Wait as long after age 2 as possible! Look at the instructions on your specific car seat but if your child’s head is more than 1 inch from the top of the carseat they should still be able to face backwards. It is MUCH safer to face backwards than forwards - it’s more important to protect their neck than their legs in case of an accident.

When should I start potty training my child?
Some children are ready to use the potty at 18 months and other children are not ready until age 3! Unfortunately the timing of potty training is not really in parents’ control, but you can enthusiastically encourage your child to become familiar with the potty at any age! Keep it positive… we want to avoid feelings of shame or guilt!

Vaccines: Seasonal Flu
Screenings: Pediatric Developmental Screen, MCHAT
Other Procedures: Blood pressure, Vision screening, Iron and Lead screening, Fluoride varnish

30 Month Visit+

Please know that children develop at their own pace. While we expect certain milestones by different ages, do not be alarmed if your child takes a slightly different course. If you have concerns at any time, please do not hesitate to bring those to our attention.

What should my 2.5 year old be doing?

  • Jumping, throwing a ball
  • Speaking in 3-4 word sentences, knows 100+ words, sings songs - about 50% of this is understandable by strangers
  • Asking many questions (Who, what, where)
  • Pretend play with other children, not just alongside them
  • Knows his/her name
  • Can tell you when they need to go potty (or needs a diaper change)
  • Recognizes emotions in others and starts to develop a sense of humor

2.5 year olds can be daredevils, and it is important to be aware of water safety and road safety. Drowning is the leading cause of death or injury in this age group.

Vaccines: Seasonal Flu
Screenings: Pediatric Developmental Screen
Other Procedures: Blood pressure, Iron screening, Vision screening, Fluoride varnish

3 Year Visit+

Please know that children develop at their own pace. While we expect certain milestones by different ages, do not be alarmed if your child takes a slightly different course. If you have concerns at any time, please do not hesitate to bring those to our attention.

What should my 3 year old be doing?

  • Working on sharing, taking turns
  • Displaying a wide range of emotions
  • Working on dressing him/herself
  • Understand 2-3 step instructions
  • Speak in short sentences
  • Plays make-believe - their imagination is really taking off - they might even have an imaginary friend which is very common!
  • Running, climbing, going up and down stairs
  • Ride a tricycle (with a helmet!)


Vaccines: Seasonal Flu
Screenings: Pediatric Developmental Screen
Other Procedures: Blood pressure, Vision screening, Iron, Lead, Fluoride varnish

4 Year Visit+

Please know that children develop at their own pace. While we expect certain milestones by different ages, do not be alarmed if your child takes a slightly different course. If you have concerns at any time, please do not hesitate to bring those to our attention.

What should my 4 year old be doing?

  • Playing! Let their imagination run wild. Free play is a wonderful way to foster their social skills
  • Telling stories, sings songs from memory
  • Knows first and last name
  • Kick and catch a ball, jumping
  • Counting up to four
  • Can copy a circle, line, and an X
  • Working on drawing inside the lines
  • Follows multi-step instructions

Safety: please discuss safety with your child. This includes: swim safety, road safety, helmets, stranger safety, privacy and personal safety.


If possible, please try to prepare your child that they will be receiving vaccines and a finger poke. At this age, children like to plan and know what is coming. It is important that we are honest with children that these procedures cause pain, but just for a second! Talking with them about this and making a plan with them during and after will help them feel safe and supported.

Vaccines: MMR/Varicella, DTap/IPV, Seasonal Flu.
Screenings: Pediatric Developmental Screen
Other Procedures: Blood pressure, Vision screening, Iron and Lead screening

School age Visit+

Please know that children develop at their own pace. While we expect certain milestones by different ages, do not be alarmed if your child takes a slightly different course. If you have concerns at any time, please do not hesitate to bring those to our attention.

Well checks are not just for young children! As children get older, they are learning so much about their environment and how to cope with challenges along the way. At these visits we pay particular attention to:


Vaccines: Seasonal Flu. 

Age 11: TDap, Menactra, HPV #1

Age 12: HPV #2

Screening: Social-emotional Development Screening
Other Procedures: Blood pressure, Vision, hearing, iron and lead screening for 5 year olds, iron screening for menstruating females, cholesterol screening as indicated.

Adolescent Visits and Beyond+

Similar to prior visits, we will discuss nutrition, elimination, sleep, exercise and social-emotional development. At these visits you child will also have the opportunity to speak with us alone and have confidential discussions. Before your visit it is helpful to have a conversation with your teen about any concerns either of you may have so that they can be brought up at the visit.

We recognize it might be hard for you to not be part of the whole visit with your child. Spending time alone with their doctor provides teens with a safe opportunity where they can ask questions and take responsibility for their health. We encourage you to respect their privacy, remembering that we are dedicated to keeping your child safe and healthy.

Vaccines: 

Seasonal Flu.

Age 16: Menactra

College-bound: Meningitis B Vaccine, 2 doses

21+: Tdap booster

Screenings: Anxiety / Depression / Substance use

Other Procedures: Vision screening, hearing screening, anemia screening for menstruating females, cholesterol screening as indicated.


Our Location

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Office Hours

Monday:

8:00 am-7:30 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am-7:30 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am-7:30 pm

Friday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

  • "The entire office staff has been kind any time we’ve needed forms filled out for sports and gotten us in for unexpected illnesses."
    Brenda B
  • "Love East Bay Pediatrics of Barrington! My son is a wrestler and had a thumb injury right before a big match mid-season. I called at 4:55 on a Friday and they said come on in!! They stayed open and waited for my son! He was sent for an x-Ray that night and we got a call the next morning thankfully that it was fine just needed to rest for a couple of days! Dr. Feretti told us where to go for a brace and even called over to make sure the medical supply had it in stock!! My son was back in business within a few days and was able to wrestle his match!! I can't say enough good things!!! They are the kind of doctors that truly care about their patients! They just hired a new doctor who's super bubbly and friendly, Dr. Raufi. She's actually the daughter of one of the other doctors in the practice. Love seeing a mother-daughter team!! They have 3 docs, Dr. Raufi (she's the newest), Dr. Grenander (her mom), and Dr. Ferretti (male doc) They are all amazing!!!"
    Robin M
  • "Everyone there was very nice and friendly, the place was very clean, and the doctor was very friendly and nice."
    Lucy C
  • "Great team of physicians. Homey feel to the practice - welcoming to young children. Really wonderful local practice."
    Dena D
  • "My three children have been patients at East Bay pediatric for over 14 years now. The quality care that my children have received is bar none. From the common cold to having a child with epilepsy, all have always been handled with the utmost care and concern. I am always able to get in a same-day sick visit, as a mother of three, I really appreciate that. I can safely say that this is a great practice to bring your child to."
    Sarah C
  • "The comfort of this office is exceptional. From Dr. G to Dr. Ferretti, they are always supportive to moms and babies. They are open and direct while offering their time for advice and comfort. I will never take my children elsewhere."
    AT
  • "As a new mom and new to Rhode Island, I was nervous about finding the perfect care for my little one. After searching for practices that were accepting new patients, I finally came across East Bay Pediatrics. The staff here are super friendly and welcoming. They are very accommodating and scheduling an appointment is easy. The doctors here are very knowledgeable and I feel like my little ones are in good hands. I highly recommend!"
    Sami C.
  • "Dr. Grenander (and Dr. Dennison before retiring) are fantastic pediatricians, both down-to-earth and practical which I appreciate. Appointments never feel rushed, ancillary staff there is great too."
    Shawna C